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Review: Jordy Takes His Talents To New Heights On ‘SMH’

Mixtape Madness Bloggers

By Mixtape Madness Bloggers

Mixtape Madness Bloggers

21 Jun 2021

For anyone who has been following Jordy’s career, there has never been any doubt about his talent with a microphone. You only have to listen to his [email protected] Freestyle’ or his strong outputs with the the rap group, Vibbar, in order to hear the technical prowess and composure of the Tottenham rapper. His last release included the stand out track, ‘A13’, which saw him gain his first million streams on Spotify. The only thing that one could be critical of is his lack of musical output to consolidate his place as one of the most promising rappers to come out of the UK, but his latest EP, ‘SMH’, consists of seven tracks that demonstrate a rapper at the very top of his game.

The opening track, ‘Cynical’, sees Jordy attack a haunting instrumental with bars that set his stall out for the rest of the tape. The rapper is able to assert himself with an onslaught of swaggering bars, whilst combining this with a refreshing honesty as he raps, ‘graveyard shifting to get my mixing paid, I can’t be like dem man stuck in their victim ways’. This opener therefore acts as a microcosm for the rest of the tape, as Jordy is able to merge his subject matter between emotionality and straight up barring. He is helped out by production from the likes of New Machine, Midnight Phunk, and Jojo Mukeza, who allow the rapper to express himself on a variety of instrumentals across the tape. In the first half of the EP, the beat switch on ‘Dark and Light’ is demonstrative of the ambition in terms of production, moving from the trap inspired hi-hats and snares to a more mellow vibe on the back end of the track. This in turn allows Jordy to show off his wide variety of flows and pockets, whilst the outro gives him the opportunity to demonstrate his melodic ability.

This versatility carries through to the next track and lead single for the EP, ‘Cherry B’. The hypnotising melodies of the flutes and hook are coupled with a tirade of flows and bars, making it one of the highlights of the album and a track that feels perfect for the summer. ‘Feel Right Now’, which follows on effortlessly from ‘Cherry B’, delivers the greatest surprise across the tape. Those familiar with Jordy’s catalogue will be aware of his ability in terms of melodies and intelligent bars, but the genre switch to Amapiano on this track, a form of South African house music, provides a refreshing change of sound in the middle of the EP. The bassline of the track pushes it forward while the female vocal sample complements Jordy’s smooth, sweetboy bars excellently. It is impressive how on what is a relatively short project, Jordy and the production team behind the tape have managed to create a body of work with significant breadth without it feeling as if this is a box ticking exercise. All seven tracks complement each other and act as a demonstration of the rappers’ talent and multifaceted ability.

The back end of the tape sees Jordy at his lyrical best, showcasing his talents as a flat out barrer on ‘Crinkum Crankum’ and ‘Die 4 The Bro’, whilst exhibiting a more open and emotional side to his pen game on ‘Therapist’. ‘Crinkum Crankum’ asserts itself as a high octane, grime inspired banger from the very outset, as Jordy shows aggression in his delivery before the beat even drops. how much ivermectin pour on for cattle The bravado in the rappers lyrics on this track is difficult to ignore, as he sprays, ‘I can never get pressured or rushed, let me get that shit straight, The label told me I’m asking for too much, and Imma keep it this way.’  This song serves as a prime example of what Jordy is capable of at his militant best, as does the closer of the EP, ‘Die 4 The Bro’. ivermectin kaufen amazon This track contains the sole feature on the album from Jordy’s cousin, Elt Cheekz, where both rappers deliver stellar verses littered with witty wordplay. Jordy raps on his verse, ‘I was on point with the shots like Stephen, Never been boring but I’ve been cheffing’. Furthermore, the inclusion of the track, ‘Therapist’, towards the end of the album sees the Tottenham man open his soul bare to the listener. The rapper opens up about social anxiety and his own mental health, whilst framing the track around the hook, ‘I don’t need P’s, I just need peace’. ivermectina animales There is an element of bravery when discussing these kind of topics on a debut project, especially in a rap game that is rife with hyper-masculinity. Jordy is thus able to show his range as an artist across these songs on the back end of the album, moving between the intensity and brilliance of a track like ‘Crinkum Crankum’, to a more raw and refreshing subject matter on ‘Therapist’.

The back end of the tape sees Jordy at his lyrical best, showcasing his talents as a flat out barrer on ‘Crinkum Crankum’ and ‘Die 4 The Bro’, whilst exhibiting a more open and emotional side to his pen game on ‘Therapist’. ‘Crinkum Crankum’ asserts itself as a high octane, grime inspired banger from the very outset, as Jordy shows aggression in his delivery before the beat even drops. The bravado in the rappers lyrics on this track is difficult to ignore, as he sprays, ‘I can never get pressured or rushed, let me get that shit straight, The label told me I’m asking for too much, and Imma keep it this way.’  This song serves as a prime example of what Jordy is capable of at his militant best, as does the closer of the EP, ‘Die 4 The Bro’. This track contains the sole feature on the album from Jordy’s cousin, Elt Cheekz, where both rappers deliver stellar verses littered with witty wordplay. Jordy raps on his verse, ‘I was on point with the shots like Stephen, Never been boring but I’ve been cheffing’. Furthermore, the inclusion of the track, ‘Therapist’, towards the end of the album sees the Tottenham man open his soul bare to the listener. The rapper opens up about social anxiety and his own mental health, whilst framing the track around the hook, ‘I don’t need P’s, I just need peace’. There is an element of bravery when discussing these kind of topics on a debut project, especially in a rap game that is rife with hyper-masculinity. Jordy is thus able to show his range as an artist across these songs on the back end of the album, moving between the intensity and brilliance of a track like ‘Crinkum Crankum’, to a more raw and refreshing subject matter on ‘Therapist’.

Words by Joe Simpson | Listen to ‘SMH’ below.

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